Medicine

Career Advice

Attending Medical school in the U.K. provides a clear route to becoming a doctor. However, students should not underestimate the importance of navigating university wisely to ensure that upon graduation they are well positioned to use their skills on a daily basis at work in hospital or in the community. This guide provides helpful tips on what you should be doing during each year of study throughout your Medical degree to ensure your profile is as competitive as possible upon graduation.

This page includes insightful information for students in all years of study of Medicine. Make sure you take note what you should be doing year by year!

Navigating Medical School - Advice from Junior Doctors

Pre-University Opportunities within Medicine


Consider “why you want to study medicine?” as this question often comes up at interview for medical school. It is useful to obtain some form of clinical experience beforehand by way of volunteering as seeing clinicians in action can help confirm if this is the right career path for you.

Focus on extracurricular activities and hobbies, not only because it looks good on paper for applications. Having interests outside medicine can help make you a more rounded person and can be an outlet for some of the stresses of working life. It can also help in your interactions with patients to know there is more to life than medicine. No-one wants their doctor to be a robot. You need a human touch in the world of medicine and interviewers often look for this in prospective candidates.

Know the academic requirements for different medical schools and use that to guide your UCAS application. Ask current medical students how they prepared for interviews - what books did they read? What questions were they asked?

Be aware there are different routes into medical school. Are you someone who wants to take a Gap year after school or go straight to university? Would you like to pursue another degree before applying for medicine as a post-graduate?

Again, consider the financial commitment. Are you going to require help? A medical degree is a longer degree than most and that can eat into your finances. Enquire about bursaries and grants, as these are available to help students in particular circumstances.

Medicine should be accessible to all regardless of their background. It is well recognised that many individuals have the ability to successfully study medicine however, they are unable to attain the required grades prior to medical school due to their circumstances. Widening Participation teams aim to support prospective medical students from under-represented backgrounds. With some medical schools providing a six-year medicine course with a foundation year, designed to widen access for students who do not meet the academic requirements for entry onto the five-year programme. There are outreach programmes for students in secondary school and sixth-form college ranging from summer schools, work experience schemes and workshops. For more information please search for Widening Participation pages on university websites. Organisations such as Leanne’s Amazing Medics and Melanin Medics also aim to support fairer access to medical schools in the UK.





Pre-Medical School Students

Getting into Medical School

Pre-University Opportunities within Medicine


Consider “why you want to study medicine?” as this question often comes up at interview for medical school. It is useful to obtain some form of clinical experience beforehand by way of volunteering as seeing clinicians in action can help confirm if this is the right career path for you.

Focus on extracurricular activities and hobbies, not only because it looks good on paper for applications. Having interests outside medicine can help make you a more rounded person and can be an outlet for some of the stresses of working life. It can also help in your interactions with patients to know there is more to life than medicine. No-one wants their doctor to be a robot. You need a human touch in the world of medicine and interviewers often look for this in prospective candidates.

Know the academic requirements for different medical schools and use that to guide your UCAS application. Ask current medical students how they prepared for interviews - what books did they read? What questions were they asked?

Be aware there are different routes into medical school. Are you someone who wants to take a Gap year after school or go straight to university? Would you like to pursue another degree before applying for medicine as a post-graduate?

Again, consider the financial commitment. Are you going to require help? A medical degree is a longer degree than most and that can eat into your finances. Enquire about bursaries and grants, as these are available to help students in particular circumstances.

Medicine should be accessible to all regardless of their background. It is well recognised that many individuals have the ability to successfully study medicine however, they are unable to attain the required grades prior to medical school due to their circumstances. Widening Participation teams aim to support prospective medical students from under-represented backgrounds. With some medical schools providing a six-year medicine course with a foundation year, designed to widen access for students who do not meet the academic requirements for entry onto the five-year programme. There are outreach programmes for students in secondary school and sixth-form college ranging from summer schools, work experience schemes and workshops. For more information please search for Widening Participation pages on university websites. Organisations such as Leanne’s Amazing Medics and Melanin Medics also aim to support fairer access to medical schools in the UK.





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